Smart and Green: The Manna House

Manna HouseChannel Lumber is committed to green and sustainable building. The Channel Lumber headquarters itself has many green amenities and features including a broad energy efficiency and solar generation platform.

In addition to the many green projects we work on, we like to showcase innovative green and smart structures, and the cutting edge technologies, products and design that are now available.

The Manna house in Los Angeles, designed by architect Jeremy Levine is a modern smart home that utilizes extensive sustainable systems, and recycled and non toxic materials. The flooring throughout the house is either recycled or unfinished plywood, as are the ceilings. All of the decking is composite recycled material. The kitchen and bathroom countertops were all poured in place with concrete using environmentally friendly fly ash.

The home is powered by a photovoltaic solar energy system. It also features a rain collection and grey water recycling system which are both utilized to water fruit trees and a garden. The passive cooling system is acheived by using low windows on one side of the house and high windows on the opposing side creating a natural breezeway, and a movable fan for days when there is no breeze.

Non VOC paints and stains were used, and all electrical appliances are energy star rated.

For more information about Channel Lumber’s continuing effort to promote green and sustainable building practice, please contact us.

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BART Berkeley Hills Tunnel

Bart car

The BART Berkeley Hills Tunnel runs between the Rockridge and Orinda stations. Construction began in 1965, with construction completed in 1967 after 465 work days. The tunnels are offset to the north of the Caldecott Tunnel, and provide a more direct alignment. The contract for construction was $31 million USD.

Channel Lumber has partnered with engineering and construction firms providing services and goods in BART construction since BART’s inception.

The Berkeley Hills tunnels are 3.1 miles longs and about 17.5 feet in diameter. There are emergency cross tunnels every 1,000 feet for evacuations. The east portal has roll down doors which close off the tunnel, or allow for ventilation in and out. The tunnel runs across the active Hayward Fault.

Construction of the tunnels involved over 27 million pounds of steel. The rate of advance between boring, blasting and excavation was 19 feet per day. The project was one of the earliest high profile tunnels to be built with Tunnel Boring Machines (TBMs) as opposed to hand mining.

The building of BART during a cycle of high inflation, led to many well documented budget and political problems. In many instances these problems led to political reform. In 1974 BART was nominated for Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement of the American Society of Civil Engineers.

For more information about Channel Lumber products and services, please contact us.

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